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What can you do in order to prevent a stress fracture from breaking completely?

Broken bones or traumatic fractures are common among runners and football players as their training changes.

Stress fractures are the result of overuse injuries, where the bone breaks down and it builds up in response to the stresses of running. Many of these fractures occur more quickly than the body can handle to rebuild itself.

There is some information for you, doctor, that you must keep in mind: 60% of athletes who sustain a stress fracture had one before. Also, women sustain the majority of stress fractures in athletics, which come from the well-known “female triad”: eating disorders, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis that can occur in athletes as young as high school age.

It is important for you to work along with a physician if the patient develops a localized bone tenderness not associated with trauma.

The importance of knowing what does a stress fracture feels like to your patient is to help him to get proper treatments as soon as possible.

Treating a stress fracture is usually not that hard. You must ask your patient to take some days off to allow the body to heal.

You must warn them that taking medicines such as aspirin can thin the blood and slow down the healing process. If the fracture is particularly intense, it may require additional assistance from an aircast or even crutches to alleviate pressure when walking.

Depending on the type of fracture, it may be necessary to maintain the resting routine up to two weeks. In severe cases, they should avoid certain types of activities up to eight weeks to allow the bone to heal and prevent further stress on the area.

It is recommended to take a slow approach and gradually work the body up to the level of activity you find to be the most appropriate for your patient. It will give time to the muscles and bones to heal properly to prevent a further injury.

Advising your patients to have an healthy diet will help them to maintain the type of nutrients that support bone health, as well.

 

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